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Historical Archaeology and Indigenous CollaborationDiscovering Histories That Have Futures$
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D. Rae Gould, Holly Herbster, Heather Law Pezzarossi, and Stephen A. Mrozowski

Print publication date: 2020

Print ISBN-13: 9780813066219

Published to Florida Scholarship Online: September 2020

DOI: 10.5744/florida/9780813066219.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM FLORIDA SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.florida.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University Press of Florida, 2022. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in FLASO for personal use.date: 21 May 2022

The Archaeology of Magunkaquog

The Archaeology of Magunkaquog

Chapter:
(p.49) 3 The Archaeology of Magunkaquog
Source:
Historical Archaeology and Indigenous Collaboration
Author(s):

Stephen A. Mrozowski

Publisher:
University Press of Florida
DOI:10.5744/florida/9780813066219.003.0003

Chapter 3 details the history of the Magunkaquog site from the features and material culture recovered through archaeological investigations in the late 1990s, combined with information from documentary records. With this site, the location of a seventeenth-century praying town meeting house, collaboration began between the archaeologists and the Nipmuc Nation. Certain practices revealed through archaeology conducted at this site provide clear evidence of a continuum between the post-contact inhabitants at Magunkaquog and their pre-contact cultural practices. Connections to other Native sites in southern New England also exist. Analyses of soils, ceramics, metals, glass, pipes, lithics, buttons and other artifacts provide a glimpse into the everyday lives of the site’s inhabitants 350 years ago as they encountered intense cultural changes with the arrival of John Eliot and other European settlers coupled with the adoption of European products into their lives.

Keywords:   Magunkaquog, Praying town, John Eliot, Culture changes, Meeting house, Material culture, Artifacts, Archaeology

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