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Chinese Diaspora Archaeology in North America$
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Chelsea Rose and J. Ryan Kennedy

Print publication date: 2020

Print ISBN-13: 9780813066356

Published to Florida Scholarship Online: September 2020

DOI: 10.5744/florida/9780813066356.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM FLORIDA SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.florida.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University Press of Florida, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in FLASO for personal use.date: 22 September 2021

Between South China and Southern California

Between South China and Southern California

The Formation of Transnational Chinese Communities

Chapter:
(p.234) 10 Between South China and Southern California
Source:
Chinese Diaspora Archaeology in North America
Author(s):

Laura W. Ng 伍穎華‎

Publisher:
University Press of Florida
DOI:10.5744/florida/9780813066356.003.0010

In the late-nineteenth and early-twentieth century, many Chinese residing in the United States were transnational migrants who kept close connections to their families in China by sending remittances, writing letters, and making temporary visits to the home village; transnational institutions also developed, which helped move money, information, and goods across the Pacific. Chinese diaspora archaeology is ripe to contribute to scholarship on transnationalism because of its attention to materiality, but few scholars have adopted a transnational framework or conducted research on Chinese migrants’ home villages. A research project that investigates the formation three diasporically linked sites—a new home village in south China and the second iteration of two Chinatowns in southern California—is a first attempt at examining the materiality of Chinese transnationalism on both sides of the Pacific. Chinese diaspora archaeology can also gain from understanding these transnationally connected communities in their current status as heritage sites.

Keywords:   transnationalism, Chinatown, home village, heritage site

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