Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Archaeological InterpretationsSymbolic Meaning within Andes Prehistory$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Peter Eeckhout

Print publication date: 2020

Print ISBN-13: 9780813066448

Published to Florida Scholarship Online: January 2021

DOI: 10.5744/florida/9780813066448.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM FLORIDA SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.florida.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University Press of Florida, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in FLASO for personal use.date: 18 October 2021

The Meaning within Moche Masks

The Meaning within Moche Masks

Chapter:
(p.180) 7 The Meaning within Moche Masks
Source:
Archaeological Interpretations
Author(s):
Edward Swenson
Publisher:
University Press of Florida
DOI:10.5744/florida/9780813066448.003.0008

In this chapter, the author examines the remains of broken ceramic masks recovered in feasting middens at the Moche ceremonial center of Huaca Colorada (AD 650–900) in the southern Jequetepeque Valley of the North Coast of Peru. One objective of the chapter is to demonstrate that Moche masking traditions varied in terms of the rites and social context in which they were employed. The ceramic masks depicting Moche powerful beings became deeply meaningful and engines of semiosis in their own right within specific frames of ritual action. Those masks shed light on Moche theories of being and the workings of the world (i.e., “ontology”). Their iconography suggests they were worn by officiants who reenacted heroic myths and stories of creation in rites that promoted agricultural bounty, life, and fertility.

Keywords:   Jequetepeque Valley, iconography, Moche, ontology

Florida Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .