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Investigating the OrdinaryEveryday Matters in Southeast Archaeology$
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Sarah E. Price and Philip J. Carr

Print publication date: 2018

Print ISBN-13: 9781683400219

Published to Florida Scholarship Online: September 2018

DOI: 10.5744/florida/9781683400219.001.0001

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Matters and Mattering

Matters and Mattering

Chapter:
(p.185) 14 Matters and Mattering
Source:
Investigating the Ordinary
Author(s):

Beth A. Conklin

Publisher:
University Press of Florida
DOI:10.5744/florida/9781683400219.003.0014

This chapter addresses the cultural anthropological perspective on how the everyday is observed and matters in extant cultures. In the author’s ethnographic work with the Wari’ people in the rainforest of western Brazil, for instance, most days bring a flow and rhythm to activities that is parallel to the flow and rhythm of many other days. When a ritual or celebration takes place, or a crisis erupts, the sensory textures and routines of everyday life are the baseline and backdrop against which the non-ordinary events’ meanings and impacts are experienced. In tracing the ways that animals and other non-human things participate in the spaces of social life, the archaeology of everyday life speaks to the larger theoretical concerns to which anthropology, more than any discipline, should be speaking: the shape of future life in the Anthropocene. Rather than replicate analytic approaches that subsume biology under “society,” or vice versa, some of the most promising approaches aim for truly integrated, biosocial understandings that take into account non-human as well as human actors and sensory experience as well as social arrangements and symbolism. The challenge, as always, is to simultaneously keep sight of all these dimensions.

Keywords:   Cultural Anthropology, Anthropocene, Wari’Animals, Non-human, Biosocial Life

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