Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
New Directions in the Search for the First Floridians$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

David K. Thulman and Ervan G. Garrison

Print publication date: 2019

Print ISBN-13: 9781683400738

Published to Florida Scholarship Online: January 2020

DOI: 10.5744/florida/9781683400738.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM FLORIDA SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.florida.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University Press of Florida, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in FLASO for personal use.date: 17 September 2021

Early Paleoindian Potentials on the Continental Shelf in the Southeastern United States

Early Paleoindian Potentials on the Continental Shelf in the Southeastern United States

Chapter:
(p.101) 6 Early Paleoindian Potentials on the Continental Shelf in the Southeastern United States
Source:
New Directions in the Search for the First Floridians
Author(s):

James S. Dunbar

Publisher:
University Press of Florida
DOI:10.5744/florida/9781683400738.003.0007

As two researchers with significant credibility in the study of early Florida, James S. Dunbar and David K. Thulman evaluate the potential for Paleoindian research on the Southeastern Continental Shelf (SECS) of the U.S. In this chapter, they discuss ways to explore Clovis and pre-Clovis landscapes (or, as they collectively call them, early Paleoindian sites) in the SECS and how researchers might narrow their search and increase their chances of finding Clovis and pre-Clovis sites offshore. In doing so, they complement Halligan’s chapter in this volume (chapter 3) on exploring Florida’s inland waters for submerged sites. They evaluate the strategies available: thoughtful searching for both analogous natural and manmade landforms and serendipity. Of the two, the second approach has arguably produced the most sites so far. Dunbar and Thulman explore the “thermal enclave hypothesis” of Russell et al (2009) and follow David Webb’s earlier work on his idea for a climatically propitious region that could support animals and plants through the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). Dunbar and Thulman further suggest the possibility of a shellfish/marine adaptation by early-Paleoindian-period colonists. They posit that finding such sites would open new windows into the study on the behaviors of the early Floridians.

Keywords:   Last Glacial Maximum (LGM), Clovis, Pre-Clovis, SECS, Shellfish/Marine adaptation, Floridian

Florida Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .