Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Picturing CubaArt, Culture, and Identity on the Island and in the Diaspora$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Jorge Duany

Print publication date: 2019

Print ISBN-13: 9781683400905

Published to Florida Scholarship Online: May 2020

DOI: 10.5744/florida/9781683400905.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM FLORIDA SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.florida.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University Press of Florida, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in FLASO for personal use.date: 28 July 2021

Theatricality in the Art of the Cuban Diaspora

Theatricality in the Art of the Cuban Diaspora

The Progression of Tropes

Chapter:
(p.175) 11 Theatricality in the Art of the Cuban Diaspora
Source:
Picturing Cuba
Author(s):

Ricardo Pau-Llosa

Publisher:
University Press of Florida
DOI:10.5744/florida/9781683400905.003.0012

Art critic and collector Ricardo Pau-Llosa proposes that certain “tropes of identity”—common metaphors inherited from previous generations of modern Cuban artists—continue to shape the work of contemporary Cuban-American artists. Pau-Llosa underlines the trope of theatricality as a form of representing “the poetics of shelter (from time, history, persecution, and other forces).” The early work in exile of Mario Carreño and Cundo Bermúdez launched a diasporic sensibility in Cuban art that still resonates in the more recent work of Emilio Sánchez, María Brito, and José Bedia. From this perspective, theatricality ties together several generations of Cuban modern artists and those who left the island after 1959.

Keywords:   Modern artists, Cuban artists, Cuban-American artists, Exile, Mario Carreño, Cundo Bermúdez, Emilio Sánchez, María Brito, José Bedia

Florida Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .