Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Archaeology of Domestic Landscapes of the Enslaved in the Caribbean$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

James A. Delle and Elizabeth C. Clay

Print publication date: 2019

Print ISBN-13: 9781683400912

Published to Florida Scholarship Online: May 2020

DOI: 10.5744/florida/9781683400912.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM FLORIDA SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.florida.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University Press of Florida, 2020. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in FLASO for personal use.date: 30 October 2020

Variation within the Village

Variation within the Village

Housing Enslaved Laborers on Coffee Plantations in Jamaica

Chapter:
(p.116) 6 Variation within the Village
Source:
Archaeology of Domestic Landscapes of the Enslaved in the Caribbean
Author(s):

James A. Delle

Kristen R. Fellows

Publisher:
University Press of Florida
DOI:10.5744/florida/9781683400912.003.0006

This chapter investigates the use of space by the enslaved population at Marshall’s Pen, an early nineteenth-century Jamaican coffee production estate. The study introduces archival information about the establishment of the plantation and use of space by enslaved laborers. By investigating architectural variability, the delineation of associated house yards, the construction of gardens and pens, and the conglomeration of these features into compounds, we are able to reconstruct how a unique community of individuals and families actively constructed space to suit their own needs. This chapter uses archaeological data collected over multiple field seasons of excavating at Marshall’s Pen to reconsider the meaning of plantation yard space. By considering the landscape of the estate from the perspectives of the enslaved people who lived both within and outside the plantation village and comparing several house yard compounds, this study suggests that people in slave villages organized themselves in non-uniform ways. These methods can perhaps shed light on social identities and differentiation within the village itself.

Keywords:   Jamaica, Coffee production, Marshall’s Pen, Slave village, Yard space

Florida Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .