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Archaeology of Domestic Landscapes of the Enslaved in the Caribbean$
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James A. Delle and Elizabeth C. Clay

Print publication date: 2019

Print ISBN-13: 9781683400912

Published to Florida Scholarship Online: May 2020

DOI: 10.5744/florida/9781683400912.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM FLORIDA SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.florida.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University Press of Florida, 2020. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in FLASO for personal use.date: 30 October 2020

Households and Dwelling Practices at the Cabrits Garrison Laborer Village

Households and Dwelling Practices at the Cabrits Garrison Laborer Village

Chapter:
(p.217) 10 Households and Dwelling Practices at the Cabrits Garrison Laborer Village
Source:
Archaeology of Domestic Landscapes of the Enslaved in the Caribbean
Author(s):

Zachary J. M. Beier

Publisher:
University Press of Florida
DOI:10.5744/florida/9781683400912.003.0010

Colonial military sites in the Caribbean have traditionally been considered as dominant monuments of European expansion, technology, control, and competition. Missing from these narratives are the diverse communities that came together within the walls of fortifications. At the Cabrits Garrison, Dominica, occupied by the British military from 1763 to 1854, part of the extensive archival record of the site is the policy of incorporating enslaved laborers into auxiliary roles and later into soldiers serving in the West India Regiments. The dynamics of this changing military labor regime are also evident in spatial and material practices at the household level. This chapter compares the way administrators in the British Army conceived of domestic areas for military enslavement at the Cabrits Garrison with the way enslaved and other lower status inhabitants actually lived in them. The study relies on archival and archaeological evidence regarding residential quarters occupied by military laborers to document the architectural character of slave housing as well as its social and cultural content. This household-level analysis provides a vantage point linking Caribbean fortifications to wider trends in the study of enslaved environments throughout the region.

Keywords:   Dominica, Fortification, Military enslavement, Slave housing, Household

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