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An Archaeology and History of a Caribbean Sugar Plantation on Antigua$
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Georgia L. Fox

Print publication date: 2020

Print ISBN-13: 9781683401285

Published to Florida Scholarship Online: September 2020

DOI: 10.5744/florida/9781683401285.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM FLORIDA SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.florida.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University Press of Florida, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in FLASO for personal use.date: 24 February 2021

Chemical Sourcing of Afro-Antiguan Ware from Betty’s Hope Plantation

Chemical Sourcing of Afro-Antiguan Ware from Betty’s Hope Plantation

A Comparative Analysis

Chapter:
(p.177) 11 Chemical Sourcing of Afro-Antiguan Ware from Betty’s Hope Plantation
Source:
An Archaeology and History of a Caribbean Sugar Plantation on Antigua
Author(s):

Benjamin C. Kirby

, Georgia L. Fox
Publisher:
University Press of Florida
DOI:10.5744/florida/9781683401285.003.0011

This chapter discusses Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA) for Afro-Antiguan and industrial ceramics excavated at Betty’s Hope plantation. Chemical analysis of the ceramics from Betty’s Hope shows that the enslaved potters of the plantation had a high degree of agency with regard to the ceramic industry. Additionally, the potters had complete control over all aspects of the production from sourcing the clay to utilizing the ceramics. While the redwares examined mostly came from an external source and originally were thought to be industrial and related to sugar production, some of them were produced locally at Betty’s Hope. The locally produced redwares could be industrial but also could represent an effort to create a unique community identity.

Keywords:   Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA), ceramics, Afro-Antiguan, chemical analysis, redwares, agency, identity

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