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Univision, Telemundo, and the Rise of Spanish-Language Television in the United States$
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Craig Allen

Print publication date: 2020

Print ISBN-13: 9781683401643

Published to Florida Scholarship Online: May 2021

DOI: 10.5744/florida/9781683401643.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM FLORIDA SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.florida.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University Press of Florida, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in FLASO for personal use.date: 26 September 2021

Lone Star Dawn, Mexican Light

Lone Star Dawn, Mexican Light

Chapter:
(p.15) 1 Lone Star Dawn, Mexican Light
Source:
Univision, Telemundo, and the Rise of Spanish-Language Television in the United States
Author(s):

Craig Allen

Publisher:
University Press of Florida
DOI:10.5744/florida/9781683401643.003.0002

Period: 1895–1961. From working-class roots in a Mexican border town, Emilio Azcárraga Vidaurreta rises as the giant and patriarch of Mexican radio and TV. He courts the government which permits his monopoly, Telesistema Méxicano. To appease opponents who protest his Americanization of TV networks in Mexico, Vidaurreta envisions a Mexican network in the U.S. He hires Rene Anselmo and partners with Frank Fouce Sr. U.S. law prohibits foreign ownership of U.S broadcasting, however, Vidaurreta devises a scheme to conceal his ownership by having Anselmo, a U.S. citizen, act as owner in his place. In San Antonio, Raoul Cortez forms the first Spanish-language TV station in U.S. Son-in-law Emilio Nicolás manages struggling KCOR but prepares for a medical career. Vidaurreta purchases KCOR on the condition Nicolás remain. He does. With KCOR as hub, parties meet in San Antonio and form the Spanish International Network.

Keywords:   Emilio Azcárraga Vidaurreta, Telesistema Méxicano, Raoul Cortez, Rene Anselmo, Emilio Nicolás, Spanish International Network

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